Alabama Crimson Tide running back Derrick Henry concluded his fantastic regular season with a spectacular performance against the Auburn Tigers, leading the Tide into the SEC Championship Game with a 46 carry, 271 yard day. Henry was there early, middle and late as he was the engine that drove the Alabama offence all day. Putting an exclamation point on ‘Bama’s win, Henry carried the ball 18 times in the fourth quarter as he set Alabama records for carries in a single game and yards in a season (1797).

It’s one thing to pile up yards against lesser opponents and in games that don’t matter, but Henry has responded in the biggest games Alabama has played. He should enjoy a trip to New York for the Heisman ceremony and, at this point, he is the favorite to bring home the big doorstop.

Pencil, ink, and watercolor on Strathmore Multimedia board. Click on the images for a larger version.

The National Air Force Museum of Canada in Trenton, ON, features a nice collection of aircraft, most of which served in the RCAF. A few examples are housed indoors, but most reside outside in the “airpark”.

Greeting visitors from the highway is an F-5 Freedom Fighter (technically the Canadair CF-116 variant) mounted in the parking lot of the Ramada Inn.

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

On the museum grounds, there is another example of this single seat jet fighter.

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-116 (F-5) Freedom Fighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canada’s first jet fighter — the Canadian-made Avro CF-100 Canuck. Janusz ┼╗urakowski dove a CF-100 to the speed of sound in 1952, technically making it Canada’s first supersonic fighter.

Avro CF-100 Canuck, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Avro CF-100 Canuck, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The Canadair CF-114 Tutor is flown by Canada’s aerobatic flight team, the Snowbirds.

Canadair CF-114 Tutor, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair CF-114 Tutor, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The MiG-21 was a Cold War interceptor flown by the USSR and its allies.

MiG-21 "Fishbed", Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

MiG-21 “Fishbed”, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

MiG-21 "Fishbed", Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

MiG-21 “Fishbed”, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canada flew a home-grown variant of the Lockheed F-104 Starfighter built by Canadair — this model is a two seat training version.

Canadair F-104D Starfighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair F-104D Starfighter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-104D Starfighter Trainer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

CF-104D Starfighter Trainer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The Labrador served in the RCAF from 1965 to 2004. This example was the last to fly in Canada.

Boeing Vertol Labrador CH113, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Boeing Vertol Labrador CH113, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Still Canada’s front line fighter/bomber aircraft, the CF-18 Hornet built by McDonnell Douglas

McDonnell Douglas CF-18B Hornet, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

McDonnell Douglas CF-18B Hornet, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Another home-build variant of an American classic jet fighter, the Canadair F-86 Sabre.

Canadair F-86 Sabre, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair F-86 Sabre, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair F-86 Sabre, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair F-86 Sabre, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The Boeing B720 was used as a passenger aircraft, then engine test vehicle.

Boeing B720, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Boeing B720, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The C-130 Hercules is still a hard-working transportation aircraft in the RCAF.

C-130E Hercules, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

C-130E Hercules, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The McDonnell CF-101 Voodoo was flown by the RCAF during the Cold War, 1971 to 1984.

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

McDonnell F-101 Voodoo, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The Canadair Argus was used for maritime patrol.

Canadair Argus, CL-28/CP-107, Mark II, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair Argus, CL-28/CP-107, Mark II, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

2015-10-18 16.43.43

This example of the Hawker Hunter jet fighter/bomber flew with the Swiss Air Force aerobatic team.

Hawker Hunter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Hawker Hunter, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair built a version of the Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star trainer, the CT-133 Silver Star. Some are still in service with the Bolivian Air Force.

Canadair Silver Star, CT-133, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Canadair Silver Star, CT-133, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star Trainer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Lockheed T-33 Shooting Star Trainer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

The deHavilland Tracker was a maritime patrol aircraft, flown from shore bases once it was retired from aircraft carrier duty.

de Havilland Tracker CP-121, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

de Havilland Tracker CP-121, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

French built SAGEM Sperwer drone was used in Afghanistan for reconnaissance duty between 2003 and 2009.

SAGEM Sperwer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

SAGEM Sperwer, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

A spectacular restoration of a Handley Page Halifax MK VII greets visitors as they enter the museum.

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Close up of the Halifax tail gun station.

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Tail Turret, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

Handley Page Halifax MK VII, Tail Turret, Canadian Air Force Museum, Trenton, ON

All in all, a terrific museum and staffed by an incredible team comprised mostly of volunteers. If you have the chance, go visit the Canadian Air Force Museum, just off Highway 401 in Trenton, ON, Canada.

CSE-HOT

CSE played the House of Targ at company event Thursday night. The complete show can be seen here.

Lineup:

Paul McRae: Guitar and Vocals
Mick Sinha: Guitar
Ed Beingessner: Bass and Vocals
Andy Marton: Drums
Michal Bienek: Vocals
Tanya Ruppell: Vocals
Tom Elliott: Vocals

Setlist:
Summer of ’69
Mick Solo/You Really Got Me
Proud Mary
Mr. Cab Driver
Turn The Page
One
Pinball Wizard
Johnny B. Goode
I Will Follow
I Want To Hold Your Hand
You Shook Me All Night Long

Ryan Shazier

Ryan Shazier, a second year linebacker for the Pittsburgh Steelers was all over the field on Sunday as the Steelers defeated the San Francisco 49’ers 43-18. He hounded and harassed 49’er QB Colin Kaepernick at every opportunity, sacking him once and making 15 tackles (11 solo). With the running threat of Kaepernick neutralized, the Steelers were able to focus on bottling up the rest of the Niner offense.

Shazier, out of Ohio State, is proving to be a very capable player showing excellent play diagnosis skills and the ability to track down and tackle even the most elusive runners.

Click on the image for a larger version.


On this date 70 years ago, a B-29 Superfortress piloted by Colonel Paul Tibbets ushered in the Atomic Age when the first atomic bomb was dropped on the Japanese city of Hiroshima. The B-29, named Enola Gay after Tibbets’ mother, took off from the tiny island of Tinian accompanied by two other B-29’s containing instruments and cameras. The sky over the primary target, Hiroshima, was clear and the bomb, nicknamed “Little Boy” was dropped at 8:15AM.

The initial blast and subsequent firestorm caused by the sixteen kiloton explosion killed nearly a third of the population of the city, an estimated 70-80,000 people. Others succumbed to radiation poisoning in the months and years ahead.

There is much debate around the use of the atomic bomb to essentially end the war in the Pacific. While scenarios are argued over, there is no doubt that an invasion of the Japanese main islands would have cost many more lives than those taken by the atomic blasts and that the conventional firebombing of Tokyo was far more devastating to human life and property. Considering that 20,000 Japanese soldiers were killed and only 216 taken prisoner during the Battle of Iwo Jima, it is self-evident that the casualties to the Japanese people during an invasion would have been monumental. After a second atomic bomb was dropped on Nagasaki three days later, the Empire of Japan finally surrendered and World War II ended.

Not be be lost in this retrospective is the fact that the scientists working on the Manhattan Project were responsible for an incredible technical achievement in designing and building an air dropped atomic bomb in 3 years. Atomic technology was unknown before the Manhattan Project and then changed the world forever early on the morning of August 6th, 1945.

Pencil on Canson watercolor paper — click on the image for a larger version.

The Enola Gay now resides at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum Stephen F. Udvar-Hazy Centre where she has been carefully restored.

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